My OBT

What if you spent every day looking for One Beautiful Thing?

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

17 Comments

I love my daily hunt for the new and different, but sometimes, you just need a dose of something reassuringly familiar. Today, we’re taking a look back at the TV show completely convinced me that ghosts are real (and kind of foxy), The Ghost and Mrs. Muir. The late 1960s classic sitcom was based on a 1947 movie of the same name starring Gene Tierney and Rex Harrison.

In case you aren’t familiar with the plot, it is based in a seaside town in Maine and takes place in a house whose current occupants must share their space with the ghost of the former tenant, a 19th century sea captain. The family consists of a charming widow (played in the TV show by Hope Lang), her two tow-headed, blue-eyed children, the salty-tongued housekeeper (Reta Shaw), and a most excellent family dog. The ghost is played by Edward Mulhare, and a youngish Charles Nelson Reilly plays Claymore Gregg, the captain’s great-nephew who rents the cottage to Mrs. Muir without telling her about the ghost.

Of course, hilarity ensues, but what really fascinated me about the program was the romantic/sexual tension between the widow and the ghost. In retrospect, it’s kind of a creepy premise for a family show, but somehow, it just worked. One of my favorite things about the show was the wonderful old house in which it took place. Alongside my maternal grandmother’s house, I have often credited this show with my love of old houses. Every time I enter one, some small part of me still hopes there’s a ghost within who will want to make friends.

As with all YouTube pirated copies of things, I’m not sure how long these videos will last, but currently, you can watch the entire series for free. The videos have been up for more than 6 years, so maybe they’ll hang around long enough for me to rewatch them all!

You can watch the series on YouTube here.

Author: Donna from MyOBT

I have committed to spending part of every day looking for at least one beautiful thing, and sharing what I find with you lovelies!

17 thoughts on “The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

  1. Never watched the show but the above posts are interesting. As suggest by a medical doctor, I talk to my wife on a regular basis. A big important decision, I ask her what I should do. Sit quietly and I get her answer. Works for me — Hal

    Liked by 2 people

  2. The Ghost and Mrs. Muir! My sister and I loved that show – and I had forgotten all about it. And there is something about the soundtracks to those 60s comedies – just hearing the first few notes made me smile. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I had such a crush on the ghost when I was little.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Oh you lovely person you! I fell in love with that show too, and it’s stuck with me all these years. Never ever thought I’d have a chance to watch it again. Thank you. -massive hugs-

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Ok, so I have to admit that I had never seen a single episode before now. I’ve heard of it, but it was a little before my time. I loved this first episode! Thank you, now I’m hooked.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I too always wanted a house like that. Another old TV house I loved was from Please Don’t Eat the Daisies.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. This show came up unexpectedly in my YouTube feed a couple of months ago. I LOVED it in 1968, and happily binge watched the whole thing. The acting is superb. I then went looking for everything the cast did afterward. I saw Hope Lange in Blue Velvet, and Charles Nelson Reilly was a game show fixture and then made the film of his play about his life. I remember when Hope Lange and Charles Nelson Reilly passed, RIP. There’s surprisingly little about Edward Mulhare, apart from Knight Rider and some guest spots. He must have kept a low profile, for some reason. Hollywood actors usually promote like mad. No Carson appearances, which Charles Nelson Reilly basically lived on. Only a couple of print interviews. I wonder why he never became an A-list movie star, showered with awards. Also no scandals, no gossipy stuff about relationships or work. He was really under the radar. I wonder if that strategy affected his career opportunities. RIP. He was truly exceptional.

    Liked by 1 person

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