My OBT

What if you spent every day looking for One Beautiful Thing?


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Etsomnia™ 92: Daddy Issues

Happy Father’s Day, Dad! Here’s what I think of you! This “Upcycled” suitcase medicine cabinet may be my best Etsy find of all time.

Et·som·ni·a (/etˈsämnēə/), noun, 1. a sleep disorder caused by obsessive Etsy browsing. 2. the surprising arrival of weird handmade merchandise ordered when one is only half conscious. (True story.)

DISCLAIMER: Though I do enjoy a good joke, and Etsomnia™ is one of my favorite things, my intention is never to discourage artists or makers of any kind. All wisecracks and criticism are meant for humorous effect only.  Please take them as seriously as they are meant, which is not at all.

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Etsomnia™ Volume 90: (Un)Wearable Art

Elephant wearable art vest by a maker who I can only assume is in third grade

Et·som·ni·a (/etˈsämnēə/), noun, 1. a sleep disorder caused by obsessive Etsy browsing. 2. the surprising arrival of weird handmade merchandise ordered when one is only half conscious. (True story.)

DISCLAIMER: Though I do enjoy a good joke, and Etsomnia™ is one of my favorite things, my intention is never to discourage artists or makers of any kind. All wisecracks and criticism are meant for humorous effect only.  Please take them as seriously as they are meant, which is not at all.

Continue reading


4 Comments

Etsomnia™ Volume 84: Wanderlust

"The Traveling Suitcase," an art piece which, in spite of its $1,000 price tag, is not for sale. By AlizarinArts who may not actually understand what Etsy is for

“The Traveling Suitcase,” an art piece which, in spite of its $1,000 price tag, is not for sale. The artist may have missed the point of Etsy

Et·som·ni·a (/etˈsämnēə/), noun, 1. a sleep disorder caused by obsessive Etsy browsing. 2. the surprising arrival of weird handmade merchandise ordered when one is only half conscious. (True story.)

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Retro Snark:

 

judge 9 Judge was a weekly satirical magazine published in the U.S. from 1881 to the mid forties. Its covers have long been avidly sought by collectors for their gorgeous, lush illustrations and witty content. Started by a group of disgruntled former Puck Magazine writers and artists, it served as the launching pad for quite a few notable careers, including Harold Ross, who used his experience on Judge to start The New Yorker in 1925. The New Yorker eventually became its main competitor, and Judge finally lost the circulation wars in 1947. Continue reading